The Media versus Caixinha

Pedro Caixinha rode into Ibrox on a wave of mystery and intrigue, because foreigner. Quarters of the Scottish footballing media duly obliged in rolling out all of their most blatantly xenophobic and tragic positions.

Some found Caixinha an easy target simply because he wasn’t the former manager. Mark Warburton had his show ponies in the media out doing his work for him across the back pages. Grown men with personal grudges against the chairman willing to reprint whatever an outgoing manager was willing to peddle. Others of course just get off on trying to stick one in on Rangers.

Caixinha inherited not only a woefully inept squad, but one that had splintered as the campaign wore on. And he did – perhaps not the best he could, but very well given the circumstances. Despite the flawed analysis of some, Caixinha’s opening couple of months in the job matched, in form, the final months of the failed Warburton era.

If you consumed only the ideas of those reliant on information from the outgoing manager – the manager who tried to walk back his own resignation in a comedy of errors – you’d have thought Caixinha was an unmitigated failure of historic proportions.

And Caixinha had a squad that was not his, several key players injured, playing appalling football, scrapping for third and with a goal difference in the single digits. Yet, if you consumed only the ideas of those reliant on information from the outgoing manager – the manager who tried to walk back his own resignation in a comedy of errors – you’d have thought Caixinha was an unmitigated failure of historic proportions.

We are now starting to see his plan unfolding – his signings materialising as the boardroom loosens the strings on the purse they had hidden away from Warburton and his recruitment guru. We see his training regimen implemented. We see a man striving to put his stamp on this squad and our club. And we see the same voices in the media still hoping – praying, even – that he fails.

Such tactics from the press are unacceptable and unbecoming, and something we will endeavour to highlight at The Rangers Observer as long as those journalists see fit to exercise such a lack of integrity. Pedro Caixinha deserves to be judged on the pitch and on the results he achieves with his squad, not the remnants of a squad built by the prior manager.